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Published on March 9 2007

Boston lead singer Brad Delp dies at 55
ATKINSON, N.H. -- Brad Delp, the lead singer for Boston, a huge rock sensation in the 1970s, was found dead Friday in his home, police said. He was 55. Atkinson police responded to a call for help at 1:20 p.m. and found Delp dead. Police Lt. William Baldwin said in a statement the death was "untimely" and that there was no indication of foul play. Delp apparently was alone at the time of his death, Baldwin said.
cover.jpg I remember the first time I heard Boston. I was overseas by that time, and already tired of the Beeb-- their music was a wee bit too "poppy" for my taste. I was walking back to the dorms one evening, listening to the tunes being blasted from the guys' dorm. (Back in the days of cheap stereo equipment at the PX, some of the guys had put together some truly impressive wattage, which they were only too happy to share with the rest of us.) As I walked between the dorms, I heard this song echoing between the buildings. I had to stop, to stand still to listen to the whole thing. I still wish I knew who it was that unknowingly introduced me to one of the bands that was the soundtrack to my teenage years.
I looked out this morning and the sun was gone Turned on some music to start my day I lost myself in a familiar song I closed my eyes and I slipped away
I wore out two vinyl copies of that album all by myself. Dense guitar sound with two or three harmonized leads, and of course the incredible vocals of Brad Delp. I can put the first album on today and play it from beginning to end, just as I did a hundred years ago. I still know every word and can hum every melody line. Although "More than a Feeling" was the huge hit from the album, my favorite was another song, cheesy lyrics and all.
Life is like the coldest winter People freeze the tears I cry Words of hail their minds are into I've got to crack this ice and fly Gonna hitch a ride Head for the other side Leave it all behind Never change my mind Gonna sail away Sun lights another day Freedom on my mind Carry me away for the last time Oh yeah

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Published on January 4 2007

...but I sure wouldn't mind seeing this band get back together. AND come to the frozen tundra!! The Police May Reunite For Tour - Entertainment
Billboard Magazine is reporting that the trio the Police will reunite for a 2007 tour of the U.K. and the United States. The concerts would be the band's tour first since the Synchronicity tour ended in March 1984. The band never officially broke up, but after the successful debut of Sting's 1985 solo album, "The Dream Of The Turtles," the trio drifted apart. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ While no one associated with the band has publicly commented on the reunion rumors, a note posted on Sting's official Web site on Wednesday offered an intriguing tease for fans of the band: "As the 30th anniversary of the first Police single approaches, discussions have been underway as to how this will be commemorated. While we can confirm that there will indeed be something special done to mark the occasion, the depth of the band's involvement still remains undetermined."

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Published on November 17 2006

 

There are a lot of very satisfied Seger fans in Wisconsin right now, and yes.... I'm one of them. And you'll have to excuse the lousy, blurry picture--we had floor seats, but we were far enough back to render flash on a little pocket camera completely useless--this pic is one of those arm's length, you-know-it-isn't-going-to-turn-out photos--but it was the best of them all.

The show opened with Steve Azar, who played a 45-minute set. He was very good, and I intend to look up his music. But man, it's gotta be rough to be an opening act with a crowd who haven't seen the-reason-they-paid-that-Ticketmonster-fee in a dozen years. Azar and his band got politely enthusiastic applause, but it was pretty obvious that the crowd thought of him as background music.

Seger and the Silver Bullet band, including the Motor City Horns, were great. After watching Seger perform at the opening of the World Series awhile back, I was a little nervous about how he would sound. His voice sounded great, though; and he took on the high notes as easily as ever. In his usual black T-shirt and jeans, he may have looked like a grandpa headed down to the hardware store on a Saturday, but he performed with as much energy as a performer thirty years younger.

The band went through the same setlist as in this post, the highlights for me being "Roll Me Away" (of course), "Wait for Me" (which had tears running down my cheeks), "Ramblin' Gamblin' Man" (Seger introduced this with "Can you believe I recorded this FORTY years ago?"); and "Travelin' Man/ Beautiful Loser", which I thought was ....wonderful. Just wonderful. If Seger decides to retire again, he went out on a high note, as far as I'm concerned. (Btw, the little video shorts are from the Indianapolis concert.)

 

I still, hours later, cannot believe that I finally, after all these years, got to hear the man perform. I am one very happy fan this morning,even after 9 hours of driving, two hours of sleep last night, and an acute case of "loudspeaker ear".

 

The only downside to the performance was having the Worlds' Tallest Cheesehead in the seats directly in front of us. That man was 6' 8", I kid you not. He did block the glare from those spotlights, though, lol.

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Published on November 2 2006

 

...Sgt. Pepper taught the band to play ...no wait, wrong song.

November 2nd, 1976. Election Day. The day I left the comforting arms of my home country for my second adventure abroad. At roughly 6 pm the day Jimmy Carter was elected President, I with my family, took off from  Washington, DC to fly to London, England to begin what was for me the best two years of my life.

Well....so far, anyway.

 Impressions of the trip.... I remember getting to Dulles with an enormous pile of luggage. It was going to be a few weeks before furniture and large trunks arrived from the states, so we had to have enough clothing, etc. to last for awhile. And since I was going to be headed up to my new school almost immediately, I had basically everything I owned crammed into a couple of large suitcases. I kid you not, I didn't know where they were going to put all this stuff on the plane. I felt like a gypsy perched on top of this mountain of baggage. The phrase that kept going through my mind as I surveyed the mountain was "You're gonna need a bigger plane".

My parents took off for ticket counters and disappeared, leaving me with one of my younger brothers to keep an eye on the pile of suitcases. I remember looking up at that enormous swooping roof, back at the suitcases, and wondering just exactly what I was supposed to do if anyone did try to make off with all of our earthly possessions. I decided I'd send Scott after them. ;-)

That flight lasted.... forever. My mother kept telling me to try to sleep, knowing that jet lag was gonna get us; but I was far too excited to sleep. OH my god, we're going to go live in a foreign country!! Nobody gets to do this in the real world, and here I am!!! Even the turbulence immediately after our meals were served could not dampen my excitement, although I thought it was very nice of the pilot to note "Ladies and Gentlemen, we'll be experiencing a little turbulence tonight" AFTER most of my dinner found it's way into my lap. I also very much enjoyed the selection of music on the little headphones the attendant handed me. Barry Manilow was the highlight-- I will never, for the rest of my days, be able to listen to the song "Mandy" again without wanting to be ill.

Heathrow...my first view of England. Hey, it's the middle of the night, why is it daylight???  They were right...it does rain a lot here, doesn't it?

Tired, bleary-eyed, stiff from being trapped for hours in those cramped seats. Head still ringing from Barry Manilow and hoping I didn't look too bad with the stains from my overturned dinner still on my jeans.  

Going through customs, I was quietly excited about getting my very first visa stamp on my very own passport. He headed into the main part of the airport to baggage and the taxi stand (I was still wondering if there was a taxi big enough for luggage mountain). As we rode down the escalator, I spotted a parrot at the bottom of the steps.

A parrot?? Whatthehell???


What I had spotted was a six-foot-tall young man in a shiny leather jacket covered in pins and heeled boots. Tattoos. Eye makeup. LOTS of eye makeup, most of it running down his cheeks as if his mascara had run in the rain. And the most enormous orange-with-purple-streaks Mohawk hairdo I'd ever seen, an easy 7" tall, towering over the shaved sides of his head. The Punk look hadn't arrived in the US yet, so this was quite the sight for my first hour in England. I was in love with England already.

We're not in Kansas anymore, Dorothy. :-D

 

We got our bags and found our way to the taxi stand with the help of a half-dozen porters. Somehow, we  managed to pack people and bags into one large cab, although I think they had to jump up and down on the "boot" (boot? I love this place!!  ) to get it to close. The cabbie, after finding out this was our very first trip to London, offered to take up past some of the sights on our way to the hotel. At least, I think that's what he said. Me and my slight Maryland southern drawl had just come up against "Cockney".

So, we saw a few sights. I was exhausted and would have done anything for a soft bed at that point, but knowing that I was going to be "going to school in London" made me look around at what was to be my city. My impression was... gray. November in London is GRAY.

And it was so exciting. I was glued to the window, looking at my new home. I couldn't WAIT to go explore, to see all the things I'd been reading about for the last six months since our move was first a possibility. I. could. not. wait.

We finally got to our hotel. I didn't care if they gave me a mattress in a hallway at this point, but we checked into a building that looked nothing like the Holiday Inns of the US. This hotel was in a building that probably dated back a couple of hundred years, and it was gorgeous. Staggering into our rooms, I headed straight for the loo (Loo? I love this place!!) and switched on the light. And switched it again. Still dark. Suddenly it dawned on me that the bathroom was black. BLACK.

No amount of lighting was going to brighten this room. My family, tired to the point of tipsyness, roared with laughter over this room. I just knew showering was going to be an experience in groping for the soap.

Finally....a bed. The end of the longest but most wonderful day. Tired as I was, it took awhile to finally sleep. I was in a new world.

I was in ENGLAND.

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Published on October 7 2006

She shoots! She SCORES. Something good had to happen this weekend, right? Item #37 on my list is about to be completed. Thirty-odd years since discovering his music and falling in love....I'm finally going to get to see him. I just knew he'd hate retirement, I just KNEW it! Bob sweetie, get the leathers out and Wait For Me, I'm coming to Milwaukee!!!
I love the answer to the inevitable question about going out on the road at the age of 61. "Yeah, I'm going to be doing a few more ballads this time." Now THAT is growing old disgracefully!
    Tickets: $60 each, not counting all the tax and Ticketmonster fees Parking Fees: probably about $100, lol Finally going to see one of my alltime favorite beloved rockers perform in REAL LIFE: Absolutely Priceless.
Two tickets. MAIN FLOOR seats. Going to be weird to not be in the nosebleed seats! :-D Who wants to go???

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Published on August 21 2006

CNN.com - Hilton: 'I, like, cry, when I listen to' CD - Aug 21, 2006
Paris" the album was set for release Tuesday. Hilton's breathy, reggae-infused single, "Stars Are Blind," has climbed to the top of Billboard's dance music chart. Of her album, she says, "I, like, cry, when I listen to it, it's so good." Hilton says the baby voice she uses on the reality TV show "The Simple Life" is an act. "I'm always playing a character," she says. "I don't talk like this really -- like a baby. I don't act like myself in public, because I don't really want to show everyone the real me. Because I have no privacy whatsoever, the only thing I have is who I really am."

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Published on July 22 2006

"Jump In My Car" Will somebody please explain to me who keeps financing these little musical gems from this guy? Who actually WATCHES them start to finish? As well as why KITT is suddenly a right-hand drive car???

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Published on July 18 2006

CNN.com - Manilow tunes annoy residents - Jul 17, 2006
SYDNEY, Australia (AP) -- It could be magic for some, but the use of loud Barry Manilow music to drive away late-night revelers from a suburban Sydney park is getting on the nerves of nearby residents. "Barry's our secret weapon," Rockdale Deputy Mayor Bill Saravinovski told The Daily Telegraph newspaper, four weeks after the start of the effort. "It seems to be working." But some people living near the park are less than enthralled. They say the barrage of "Copacabana," "Could It Be Magic" and "Que Sera Sera," blasting from 9 p.m. to midnight every Friday, Saturday and Sunday is driving them crazy. Officials have given in a little, agreeing to turn down the volume a bit after residents complained. "The initial reaction was that they found it irritating," Saravinovski said. "I'm not disputing what the residents are saying. I can't swallow some of the tracks like `Mandy.'
Heh. That's hilarious. Although in my decrepit old age, I could probably tolerate a slew of Barry Manilow songs more easily than say....oh, how about this. Sorry, Shannon.

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Published on June 2 2006

Funny I don't remember the music of 1978 being quite *this* bad. It really, really hurts to watch. I may never be able to read "the Corner" again if they keep putting up links like this. Click the "keep reading" for a truly painful experience.

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Published on May 15 2006

CNN.com - BBC interviews wrong man - May 15, 2006
In a reaction story to the verdict that is now circulating widely on the Internet, consumer affairs correspondent Karen Bowerman welcomed who the BBC thought was computer expert Guy Kewney. As Bowerman introduced him, there's a moment when the still unidentified driver realized the mistake. He scrunched his face into a grimace, and in panic tried to open his mouth as if to explain. "Were you surprised by this verdict today?" Bowerman asked. "I'm very surprised to see the verdict come on me because I was not expecting that," he said in a heavy French accent, blinking in the studio lights. "When I came, they told me something else." Growing more confident, he gamely went on to deliver his opinion on the future of music downloads following the landmark verdict.
Hilarious story. I wonder if the video is available on youtube yet?

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