Published on September 16 2006

Yep, got over to the Demo rides and down came the rain..... and for SOME reason, Harley-Davidson doesn't think they should let us overeager possible buyers play on their toys in a downpour. Can't imagine why.... So all I got to do was dry the seats (I will leave it to your imagination as to exactly *how* I did that) of various models. Today, the Night Train is my favorite!!! Ninety-six inches (I've had CARS with smaller motors!) of throaty rumble. That "blacked-out" stealth paintjob (I never got into the chrome thing). Drag bars. Bobbed fenders. Drool. Even if it *is* a Softail. Squirrely damn things.
my next bike.JPG Tomorrow, I'll probably fall in love with the V-rod again. Heh.

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Published on September 15 2006

Seger's eager to tour
Seger's eager to tour Detroit rock legend ready for spotlight A ton of restless Bob Seger fans may be on the cusp of relief. The Detroit rocker said it's all but a done deal that he'll tour this winter, more than a decade after his last, record-breaking concert trek. With his new album, "Face the Promise," set to hit stores (last) Tuesday, Seger and his band have quietly been revving up for a series of live dates -- what could be the long-awaited answer for devotees who have increasingly clamored to get the 61-year-old star back on the road. Any tour announcement would come by the end of this month, a Seger representative said. A couple dozen dates have been proposed, Seger said -- far fewer than the 1996 outing that put the rocker on 65 stages in six months. That blockbuster run included eight sold-out Detroit-area shows and what Palace of Auburn Hills officials still describe as the biggest concert run in venue history. More than 100,000 seats sold within an hour.

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Published on September 14 2006

Ya gotta wonder just a teensy bit about Judges these days. Judge warns victims' mother not to cry on stand
BARTOW, Florida (Court TV) -- Warned by the judge that tears could trigger a mistrial, a mother was stoic in front of a Florida jury Tuesday as she relived the day she discovered the bloodied bodies of her children. .....Dressed from head to toe in black, the grieving mother had barely taken her seat in the witness box Tuesday before she began stifling sobs while family members and friends sat red-eyed in the gallery holding tissue boxes. The emotional display prompted a swift response from lawyers representing the defendant, Nelson Serrano, who faces the death penalty if convicted of four counts of first-degree murder. Circuit Judge Susan Roberts agreed that an emotional display would unfairly bias the jurors against the defendant, and issued a stern warning to the prosecutor and, indirectly, to the witness and her family. "If she gets emotional, I will grant a motion for a mistrial," Roberts said, eliciting emphatic headshakes from Dosso's friends and family. "If [the prosecutor] wants to put her on the stand with that in mind, he may do so."
Yeah. You discover the bodies of your son, your daughter, and your son-in-law shot to death in an office. You have to testify in front of the person who has been accused of the murders, but you aren't supposed to show any emotion. Couldn't have anybody thinking that discovering your children's murdered bodies might be upsetting, after all--it might bias the jury, you know. Some people have been in the Judge profession a little too long, methinks. And then we have this story.
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The chief judge in Saddam Hussein's genocide trial said Thursday that he does not believe Saddam was a dictator. Judge Abdullah al-Amiri made the remark in a friendly exchange with the deposed leader, a day after the prosecution said the judge should step down because he is biased toward the defense. Saddam and his co-defendants are being tried on charges of committing atrocities against Kurds in northern Iraq nearly two decades ago. Questioning a Kurdish witness Thursday, Saddam said, "I wonder why this man wanted to meet with me, if I am a dictator?" The judge interrupted: "You were not a dictator. People around you made you (look like) a dictator." "Thank you," Saddam responded, bowing his head in respect.
I'm hoping that in my upcoming legal adventures, I'm not required to testify in front of these judges. On the other hand, maybe the second guy would at least absolve me of being a dictator!!!!

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Published on September 13 2006

There's a deep throaty rumble in the distance this morning, something far away. You can feel it getting closer, though. IT'S FALL RIDE TIME!!! I hope to be posting some pictures from 'Sconsin's "Little Sturgis", even though I'll be working this weekend. Still might get a little riding time in, though. "Precious" will be out there in the crowd!!
mine

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Published on September 11 2006

The original post, with comments, may be found here.
2996
[UPDATE: I purchased the Sept. 11th edition of US News and World Report today. Inside, I found an article concerning Cmdr. Shanower's family and the man who recovered him. Read the article here. It's worth it.] Every one of us remembers where we were that day.In the East, our busy days screeched to a halt at the news. In the West, we awoke to a nightmare with our morning coffee. Here in the Midwest, I was finishing a night shift and trying to get a nap after work when my husband shook me awake to tell me I had to come quick, something had happened. Every one of us spent that day watching or listening to the awful news from the East. I spent much of it sobbing for the enormous loss of life and knowing that I was watching my generation's Pearl Harbor....live. When I was given my assignment for the 2996 project, I immediately felt a link to my subject. We both happened to be the same age with a love of travel, are both Midwestern natives--in fact, my subject went to college not far from where I live. The similarities ended there, however; but as I read more about him, Respect replaced that imagined kinship. It's been five years since that day. Five years since the day Americans learned of the war that had been declared against us, a war heralded in opening salvos against our military and diplomats numerous times since the late 70's in places like Beirut, Tehran, Kenya, and Yemen. This was a war most of us were only dimly aware of until the day it came home to American soil on the bright morning of September 11, 2001 in New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington, DC.Dan Shanower.jpg Cmdr. Dan Frederic Shanower, 40 years old that year, was aware of this war long before we civilians were. A career Naval Intelligence Officer based at the Pentagon, he spent his days studying, analyzing, and reporting on intelligence data. Shanower had spent his adult working life in Intelligence and Foreign Affairs, from early in his career debriefing pilots on the USS Midway and Assistant Intelligence Officer aboard USS Coronado; to a stint with the US State Department working for the ambassador to the Phillipines; to the Office of Naval Intelligence; to his last post at the Pentagon. As Officer-in-Charge of the Chief of Naval Operations Intelligence Plot, he was responsible for providing current intelligence support to the Navy Secretariat, Chief of Naval Operations staff, and the Director of Naval Intelligence. His job was to assemble daily intelligence data, analyses of geopolitical data and troop movements into the series of morning briefings for these senior Pentagon officials. At the time of his death, he was finishing his final course for a Master's degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College. At the moment that American Airlines Flight 77 hit the Pentagon's west side, Cmdr. Shanower was in his newly renovated office with a team of analysts, collecting data on the World Trade Center attacks. We may not have immediately realized the source or understood the reasons for the attacks, but it's probably safe to say that Shanower knew. Much of the following information is taken from here, the Arlington Cemetary website for Cmdr. Shanower. Dan Shanower was raised in Naperville, Illinois; the fourth of five children born to a schoolteacher and a college professor. By all accounts, he was a smart, inquisitive and somewhat mischievous boy.
Dan played in Little League, but his career highlight was the game during which he lay down in the outfield. "He did it for fun, which every kid should do," said Eugene Drendel, who had a son in Little League at the same time. "But he wasn't into who won or who lost, to put it gently. He did, on occasion, just take a rest." Dan's high school exploits have become favorite anecdotes for those who shared his teenage years. There was the time Dan buried an unwanted car engine in his parents' yard. The time he installed living-room furniture in the Naperville Central High School courtyard. The time he named his soon-to-be-dissected fetal pig after WGN farm reporter Orion Samuelson. The time Mayor George Pradel, then a police officer, pulled Dan over after curfew only to find he had replaced his car seats with lawn chairs.
After graduating from Central High in 1979, the free-spirited young man headed north to Wisconsin to Carroll College. During his college years he also spent time as an intern in the US Senate, and took a trip to the Soviet Union, finally graduating in 1983. In 1985, he joined the Navy.
He spent the first decade of that career overseas, first in Japan and later in the Phillipines. He made the most of his life abroad; he climbed Mount Fuji and tried to learn Japanese. At gatherings, he could captivate a crowd with his sea stories. He also built a reputation as a smart, confident officer who loved his profession. "He once told me it was almost a religion with him," Cmdr. Stewart Holbrook said. "He took his job very seriously, protecting his country and just having pride in the Navy." His parents received photos of Dan in foreign ports wearing a kimono, peeking through bamboo stalks, hoisting his ceremonial sword. His nieces and nephews received stuffed iguanas and machetes for birthdays.
In 1999, Shanower moved to Washington, DC and began working at the Pentagon in 2000.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
About a year ago, I had the privelege of touring the Pentagon with friends. The building seems unscarred now, but there is a new room adjacent to the Pentagon Chapel deep within the huge building. This is the 9/11 memorial, and seeing that dimly lit room is deeply affecting. Black marble tablets are etched with the names of the 184 victims of American Airlines' Flight 77's plunge into the building. Although I of course was unable to take away a photograph of this room, it's possible to tour the Pentagon Memorial here. Take the tour; it's worth the visit. ACF43.jpg boot2.jpg Next to the DuPage River in Shanower's hometown of Naperville, Illinois is another memorial to the victims of 9/11. Cut into the sculpture is an outline of Commander Shanower's boot print. He is also memorialized at the Naval War College in Newport, R.I..memorial.jpg Memorials are beautiful, a way to honor the memory of the departed, a way to show our respect and our grief, our resolve to never forget, and a means of passing those lessons on to those who will come after us. I think the greatest memorial to this man, and the lesson which should be passed to the future, are to be found in his own words. In an essay published in the May 1997 issue of Proceedings magazine, Shanower wrote these words about four shipmates who had been lost in an accident ten years before:
"I miss their friendship, but I believe that because they died in the prime of their lives in the service of our country their sacrifices take on a special meaning..... I think, however, that to a man, what really would have impressed them was to know that to their shipmates they had come to personify the virtues that we salute on this national holiday. The military loses scores of personnel every year in training or operational accidents. Each one risked and lost his or her life for something they believed in, leaving behind friends, family, and shipmates to bear the burden and celebrate their devotion to our country...... They knew the risks they were taking and gave their lives for something bigger than themselves. I'll never forget them, and I'll never forget the day I learned that freedom isn't free."
Hopefully, the rest of us won't forget the day we learned the same lesson.
freedom.jpg

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Published on September 11 2006

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Published on September 10 2006

Check out this photo, of the Pentagon lit up in memory.

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Published on September 10 2006

In the calling out to one another of the lovers up and down the strand In the sound of the waves and the cries of the seagulls circling the sand In the fragments of the songs carried down the wind from some radio In the murmuring of the city in the distance ominous and low I hear the sound of the world where we played And the far too simple beauty of the promises we made If you ever need holding call my name, I'll be there If you ever need holding, no holding back, I'll see you through Sky blue and black Where the touch of the lover ends and the soul of the friend begins Theres a need to be separate and a need to be one And a struggle neither wins Where you gave me the world I was in and a place I could make a stand I could never see how you doubted me when I let go of your hand Yeah, and I was much younger then And I must have thought that I would know If things were going to end And the heavens were rolling like a wheel on a track And our sky was unfolding and it'll never fold back Sky blue and black And I'd have fought the world for you if I thought that you wanted me to Or put aside what was true or untrue if I'd known thats what you needed What you needed me to do But the moment has passed by me now To have put away my pride And just come through for you somehow You're the color of the sky reflected in each store-front window pane Youre the whispering and the sighing of my tires in the rain Youre the hidden cost and the thing thats lost in everything I do Yeah and Ill never stop looking for you In the sunlight and the shadows and the faces on the avenue Thats the way love is Sky blue and black --Jackson Browne

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Published on September 10 2006

2996
[UPDATE: I purchased the Sept. 11th edition of US News and World Report today. Inside, I found an article concerning Cmdr. Shanower's family and the man who recovered him. Read the article here. It's worth it.] Every one of us remembers where we were that day. In the East, our busy days screeched to a halt at the news. In the West, we awoke to a nightmare with our morning coffee. Here in the Midwest, I was finishing a night shift and trying to get a nap after work when my husband shook me awake to tell me I had to come quick, something had happened. Every one of us spent that day watching or listening to the awful news from the East. I spent much of it sobbing for the enormous loss of life and thinking that I was watching my generation's Pearl Harbor....live. When I was given my assignment for the 2996 project, I immediately felt a link to my subject. We both happened to be the same age with a love of travel, are both Midwestern natives--in fact, my subject went to college not far from where I live. The similarities ended there, however; but as I read more about him, Respect replaced that imagined kinship. It's been five years since that day. Five years since the day Americans learned of the war that had been declared against us, a war heralded in opening salvos against our military and diplomats numerous times since the late 70's in places like Beirut, Tehran, Kenya, and Yemen. This was a war most of us were only dimly aware of until the day it came home to American soil on the bright morning of September 11, 2001 in New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington, DC.Dan Shanower.jpg Cmdr. Dan Frederic Shanower, 40 years old that year, was aware of this war long before we civilians were. A career Naval Intelligence Officer based at the Pentagon, he spent his days studying, analyzing, and reporting on intelligence data. Shanower had spent his adult working life in Intelligence and Foreign Affairs, from early in his career debriefing pilots on the USS Midway and Assistant Intelligence Officer aboard USS Coronado; to a stint with the US State Department working for the ambassador to the Phillipines; to the Office of Naval Intelligence; to his last post at the Pentagon. As Officer-in-Charge of the Chief of Naval Operations Intelligence Plot, he was responsible for providing current intelligence support to the Navy Secretariat, Chief of Naval Operations staff, and the Director of Naval Intelligence. His job was to assemble daily intelligence data, analyses of geopolitical data and troop movements into the series of morning briefings for these senior Pentagon officials. At the time of his death, he was finishing his final course for a Master's degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College. At the moment that American Airlines Flight 77 hit the Pentagon's west side, Cmdr. Shanower was in his newly renovated office with a team of analysts, collecting data on the World Trade Center attacks. We may not have immediately realized the source or understood the reasons for the attacks, but it's probably safe to say that Shanower knew. Much of the following information is taken from here, the Arlington Cemetary website for Cmdr. Shanower. Dan Shanower was raised in Naperville, Illinois; the fourth of five children born to a schoolteacher and a college professor. By all accounts, he was a smart, inquisitive and somewhat mischievous boy.
Dan played in Little League, but his career highlight was the game during which he lay down in the outfield. "He did it for fun, which every kid should do," said Eugene Drendel, who had a son in Little League at the same time. "But he wasn't into who won or who lost, to put it gently. He did, on occasion, just take a rest." Dan's high school exploits have become favorite anecdotes for those who shared his teenage years. There was the time Dan buried an unwanted car engine in his parents' yard. The time he installed living-room furniture in the Naperville Central High School courtyard. The time he named his soon-to-be-dissected fetal pig after WGN farm reporter Orion Samuelson. The time Mayor George Pradel, then a police officer, pulled Dan over after curfew only to find he had replaced his car seats with lawn chairs.
After graduating from Central High in 1979, the free-spirited young man headed north to Wisconsin to Carroll College. During his college years he also spent time as an intern in the US Senate, and took a trip to the Soviet Union, finally graduating in 1983. In 1985, he joined the Navy.
He spent the first decade of that career overseas, first in Japan and later in the Phillipines. He made the most of his life abroad; he climbed Mount Fuji and tried to learn Japanese. At gatherings, he could captivate a crowd with his sea stories. He also built a reputation as a smart, confident officer who loved his profession. "He once told me it was almost a religion with him," Cmdr. Stewart Holbrook said. "He took his job very seriously, protecting his country and just having pride in the Navy." His parents received photos of Dan in foreign ports wearing a kimono, peeking through bamboo stalks, hoisting his ceremonial sword. His nieces and nephews received stuffed iguanas and machetes for birthdays.
In 1999, Shanower moved to Washington, DC and began working at the Pentagon in 2000.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
About a year ago, I had the privelege of touring the Pentagon with friends. The building seems unscarred now, but there is a new room adjacent to the Pentagon Chapel deep within the huge building. This is the 9/11 memorial, and seeing that dimly lit room is deeply affecting. Black marble tablets are etched with the names of the 184 victims of American Airlines' Flight 77's plunge into the building. Although I of course was unable to take away a photograph of this room, it's possible to tour the Pentagon Memorial here. Please take the tour; it's worth the visit. ACF43.jpg boot2.jpgNext to the DuPage River in Shanower's hometown of Naperville, Illinois is another memorial to the victims of 9/11. Cut into the sculpture is an outline of Commander Shanower's boot print. He is also memorialized at the Naval War College in Newport, R.I..memorial.jpg Memorials are beautiful, a way to honor the memory of the departed, a way to show our respect and our grief, our resolve to never forget, and a means of passing those lessons on to those who will come after us. I think the greatest memorial to this man, and the lesson which should be passed to the future, are to be found in his own words. In an essay published in the May 1997 issue of Proceedings magazine, Shanower wrote these words about four shipmates who had been lost in an accident ten years before:
"I miss their friendship, but I believe that because they died in the prime of their lives in the service of our country their sacrifices take on a special meaning..... I think, however, that to a man, what really would have impressed them was to know that to their shipmates they had come to personify the virtues that we salute on this national holiday. The military loses scores of personnel every year in training or operational accidents. Each one risked and lost his or her life for something they believed in, leaving behind friends, family, and shipmates to bear the burden and celebrate their devotion to our country...... They knew the risks they were taking and gave their lives for something bigger than themselves. I'll never forget them, and I'll never forget the day I learned that freedom isn't free."
Hopefully, the rest of us won't forget the day we learned the same lesson.
freedom.jpg

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Published on September 10 2006

.....What's everybody watching on TV tonight?? This is what's on here And in discussing all the controversy and the blaming and "whose fault was it's" going on about this movie; as usual, Lilecks says it better than I ever could....
Just so you know: 9/11 reset the clock for me. All hands went to midnight. I’m interested in what people did after that date, and if the movie shows that before the attack one side lacked feck and the other was feck-deficient, I don't worry about it. It's like revisiting Congressional debates about Hawaiian harbor security in November 1941. Y'all get a pass. The Etch-A-Sketch's turned over. Now: what have you said lately?

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