Published on July 18 2005

The State | 07/10/2005 | Illegal aliens getting home loans
MILWAUKEE — Javier and Araceli Garcia, illegal immigrants from Mexico, never imagined that the U.S. government would help them buy a home. But last year, the couple secured a $54,600 mortgage to buy the gray, 1,158-square-foot bungalow that they had been renting for eight months. The Wisconsin housing authority financed the loan. The Internal Revenue Service gave them an identification number that let them apply for it at local Mitchell Bank, which was happy to take their business. “We thought we would never buy a home, because of our (illegal) status,” said Mrs. Garcia.
Can anybody explain to me why my government, funded by my tax dollars, is helping illegal aliens buy homes? Did I miss something here?

See comments

Written by admin

Published on #Current Affairs

Repost0

Published on July 18 2005

Daily Blog: On Language And Reality The President of my new International responds to a posting on the Working Life blog. Interesting to know that he reads this.

See comments

Written by admin

Published on #Current Affairs

Repost0

Published on July 17 2005

Hot......Hot.........Hot melt1

See comments

Written by admin

Published on #photo, #Photos, #Pics and Babbling

Repost0

Published on July 10 2005

Written by admin

Published on #Pics and Babbling

Repost0

Published on July 10 2005

Went for a ride along the Bearskin Bike Trail this morning. It's a gorgeous ride through a state forest, along an old railbed. Supposedly, one day it will connect with my normal ride on the Hiawatha trail, but for now I have to drive up to Highway K to the trail head. I rode about 6 miles in on the trail before turning to head back out. Great riding, crosses the Bearskin Creek a dozen times on wooden bridges. The bridges' surfaces are a little damaged from the snowmobiles in the winter, but still not too bad. The trail is surfaced with rotten granite rather than compacted limestone, but it's kept very well groomed. A narrow-tired bike might have a little trouble, but I thought it was a fine surface. The only critters I saw today were a couple of turtles on their logs, trout under one bridge along the creek, the usual assortment of eagles, and a blue heron fishing near the beaver pond (first picture) where I turned around. Click on the pics: { gallery [bearskinsmall] }

See comments

Written by admin

Published on #'Sconsin stuff, #Photos

Repost0

Published on July 7 2005

"It’s important, however, that those engaged in terrorism realize that our determination to defend our values and our way of life is greater than their determination to cause death and destruction to innocent people in a desire to impose extremism on the world. Whatever they do it is our determination that they never succeed in destroying what we hold dear in this country and in other civilized nations throughout the world." --Tony Blair
flags

See comments

Written by admin

Published on #Current Affairs

Repost0

Published on July 6 2005

snore .......and 24 to go.

See comments

Written by admin

Published on #'Sconsin stuff, #Background

Repost0

Published on July 5 2005

What the heartland can offer those on the coasts | csmonitor.com
For many of the 50 percent of Americans living on both coasts, the Midwest is flyover country, best seen, sophisticates think, from 39,000 feet. Airline passengers might look out the window briefly to survey the vast, fertile patchwork of green, gold, and brown below. But most are only too happy to go back to their magazines and inflight movies. And don't even mention the prospect of changing planes at O'Hare. Horrors. For those coastal residents, the cultural delineation is clear: Things cosmopolitan are In, while those with a country setting are Out. Or are they?
Is O'hare really considered "country" by the coasties?

See comments

Written by admin

Published on #'Sconsin stuff, #Pics and Babbling

Repost0

Published on July 4 2005

Written by admin

Published on #Current Affairs, #Photos

Repost0

Published on July 3 2005

JS Online: Gaylord Nelson dies at age 89
The former Wisconsin governor and U.S. senator is regarded as one of the most significant people of the 20th century in Wisconsin, ranking fourth in a survey of 42 historians and other experts. Only Progressive Gov. Robert M. LaFollette Sr., conservationist Aldo Leopold and architect Frank Lloyd Wright ranked higher in the 1999 survey by the Journal Sentinel. When the same panel listed the top 10 events of the century, they picked as the sixth most significant Nelson's establishment, as governor in 1961, of the state's Outdoor Recreation Acquisition Program. The initiative resulted in the long-range acquisition, preservation and enhancement of a million acres of recreational land. Yet as impressive as Nelson's achievements were for and in his home state, his most enduring legacy was his unrelenting effort to protect the environment - not only in Wisconsin but everywhere. He was the founder in 1970 of Earth Day, which is regarded as the beginning of the modern environmental movement. Twenty-five years later, Nelson received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award, for that and his lifelong work on behalf of the environment.
Long article on the life of Gaylord Nelson in today's Milwaukee Journal. I get a kick out of reading the sections where Nelson talked about working with colleagues from the other side of the aisle--and becoming good friends with some of them. Sure doesn't sound like today's politics, does it?

See comments

Written by admin

Published on #'Sconsin stuff, #Current Affairs

Repost0